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Showing 25 course outlines from 3403 matches

1951

PHIL 222

: Intermediate Logic
2022 Semester Two (1225)
Natural deduction for propositional and predicate logic; introductory metalogic and related topics in formal logic.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: PHIL 101
Restriction: PHIL 201
1952

PHIL 222

: Intermediate Logic
2021 Semester Two (1215)
Natural deduction for propositional and predicate logic; introductory metalogic and related topics in formal logic.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: PHIL 101
Restriction: PHIL 201
1953

PHIL 222

: Intermediate Logic
2020 Semester Two (1205)
Natural deduction for propositional and predicate logic; introductory metalogic and related topics in formal logic.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: PHIL 101
Restriction: PHIL 201
1954

PHIL 225

: Power, Critique and Emancipation
2024 Semester One (1243)
What is power? When are relations of power are legitimate and illegitimate? How is power structured in the modern world? How can illegitimate structures of power can be resisted and reordered to promote justice and human flourishing? This course examines and analyses cultural, economic, political and epistemic structures of power, including gender, race, and class.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points passed
Restriction: PHIL 345
1955

PHIL 225

: Power, Critique and Emancipation
2023 Semester One (1233)
What is power? When are relations of power are legitimate and illegitimate? How is power structured in the modern world? How can illegitimate structures of power can be resisted and reordered to promote justice and human flourishing? This course examines and analyses cultural, economic, political and epistemic structures of power, including gender, race, and class.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points passed
Restriction: PHIL 345
1956

PHIL 225

: Power, Critique and Emancipation
2022 Semester Two (1225)
What is power? When are relations of power are legitimate and illegitimate? How is power structured in the modern world? How can illegitimate structures of power can be resisted and reordered to promote justice and human flourishing? This course examines and analyses cultural, economic, political and epistemic structures of power, including gender, race, and class.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points passed
Restriction: PHIL 345
1957

PHIL 225

: Power, Critique and Emancipation
2021 Semester Two (1215)
What is power? When are relations of power are legitimate and illegitimate? How is power structured in the modern world? How can illegitimate structures of power can be resisted and reordered to promote justice and human flourishing? This course examines and analyses cultural, economic, political and epistemic structures of power, including gender, race, and class.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points passed
Restriction: PHIL 345
1958

PHIL 225

: Power, Critique and Emancipation
2020 Semester One (1203)
An examination of support for political struggles for freedom, justice and recognition through the philosophical critique of modern society. Topics include science and technology, bureaucratisation, social control, social alienation, mass communication, the commodification of culture, and the idea of critique. Theorists may include Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, Benjamin, Arendt, Habermas and Honneth.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 15 points in Philosophy, and 30 points passed
Restriction: PHIL 345
1959

PHIL 231

: Indigenous Philosophy
2024 Semester Two (1245)
An exploration of concepts and ideas from a range of Indigenous philosophies, critically examining these with a view to understanding their theoretical underpinnings, conceptual migrations, and contemporary significance in both local and global contexts.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage I in Philosophy or 60 points passed
Restriction: PHIL 331
1960

PHIL 250

: Philosophy and the Environment
2024 Semester Two (1245)
Philosophical questions relating to the environment and our use of it, such as the following: Do we have obligations to future generations, especially concerning preservation of the environment? What are our moral and epistemic responsibilities regarding climate change and other environmental issues? Does nature have intrinsic value? Is it better to live in a natural world or a virtual world.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points
Restriction: PHIL 351
1961

PHIL 250

: Philosophy and the Environment
2023 Semester Two (1235)
Philosophical questions relating to the environment and our use of it, such as the following: Do we have obligations to future generations, especially concerning preservation of the environment? What are our moral and epistemic responsibilities regarding climate change and other environmental issues? Does nature have intrinsic value? Is it better to live in a natural world or a virtual world.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points
Restriction: PHIL 351
1962

PHIL 260

: Philosophy of Science
2023 Semester Two (1235)
Addresses philosophical questions about science, such as: What distinguishes science from pseudoscience? How is scientific knowledge generated and structured? Should we believe scientific claims about things we cannot directly observe? Do scientific theories give us true accounts of the world? Examines philosophical accounts of science and cases from historical and contemporary scientific research. A background in science is not expected.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points
Restriction: PHIL 360
1963

PHIL 260

: Philosophy of Science
2021 Semester Two (1215)
What makes science a distinctive way of discovering knowledge about our world whether natural, biological or social? Ever since science started in Ancient Greece, a number of different theories about the worldview, methods and rationality of science have been proposed that distinguish it from religion, pseudo-science and myth. The course examines some of these accounts of the nature of science.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points
Restriction: PHIL 360
1964

PHIL 261

: Metaphysical Structures of the World
2020 Semester One (1203)
Metaphysics attempts to give a quite general picture of the nature and structure of the world, and particularly investigates philosophical problems which thereby arise. Science, common sense, religions and cultures all presuppose metaphysical worldviews. Traditional metaphysical problems concern laws, causation, time, space, substance, identity, attributes and universals, free will, reality, existence etc. Course topics will be selected from such traditional problems.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points
Restriction: PHIL 361
1965

PHIL 263

: Philosophy of Biology
2022 Semester One (1223)
Examines philosophical and conceptual issues in the life sciences. Topics may include the units and levels of selection, adaptationism, the evolution of altruism, biology and ethics, sociobiology and evolutionary psychology, cultural evolution, evolution versus creationism, and the origin and nature of life.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points
Restriction: PHIL 363
1966

PHIL 263

: Philosophy of Biology
2020 Semester Two (1205)
Examines philosophical and conceptual issues in the life sciences. Topics may include the units and levels of selection, adaptationism, the evolution of altruism, biology and ethics, sociobiology and evolutionary psychology, cultural evolution, evolution versus creationism, and the origin and nature of life.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points in Philosophy or 60 points
Restriction: PHIL 363
1967

PHIL 268

: Ethical Theory
2022 Semester One (1223)
Philosophical study of moral theory, in both normative ethics and meta-ethics. Topics covered may include: accounts of well-being such as hedonism, preference theory, and objectivism; theories of right action such as consequentialism and contractualism; the demandingness of morality; the role of intuitions in moral theory; and the status and justification of moral theories.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage I in Philosophy or any 60 points passed from the BA or 30 points in Global Politics and Human Rights
Restriction: PHIL 368
1968

PHIL 268

: Ethical Theory
2020 Semester One (1203)
Philosophical study of moral theory, in both normative ethics and meta-ethics. Topics covered may include: accounts of well-being such as hedonism, preference theory, and objectivism; theories of right action such as consequentialism and contractualism; the demandingness of morality; the role of intuitions in moral theory; and the status and justification of moral theories.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage I in Philosophy or any 60 points passed from the BA or 30 points in Global Politics and Human Rights
Restriction: PHIL 368
1969

PHIL 301

: Philosophy for Children
2021 Semester Two (1215)
Provides a thorough practical grounding in facilitation of philosophical communities of inquiry, and in the construction of materials to stimulate philosophical inquiry. Opportunities for classroom practice in co-operating primary schools will be provided to participants who are not classroom-based.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 60 points in Philosophy
Restriction: PHIL 701
1970

PHIL 301

: Philosophy for Children
2020 Semester Two (1205)
Provides a thorough practical grounding in facilitation of philosophical communities of inquiry, and in the construction of materials to stimulate philosophical inquiry. Opportunities for classroom practice in co-operating primary schools will be provided to participants who are not classroom-based.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 60 points in Philosophy
Restriction: PHIL 701
1971

PHIL 302

: Medieval Philosophy
2023 Semester Two (1235)
A detailed introduction to either the work of a leading medieval philosopher, for example Augustine, Abaelard, Scotus or Ockham, or to one or more of the topics which were of interest to medieval philosophers. The course aims to show how understanding medieval philosophy is essential for the history of Christian thought and philosophy up to modern times.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy
1972

PHIL 302

: Medieval Philosophy
2022 Semester One (1223)
A detailed introduction to either the work of a leading medieval philosopher, for example Augustine, Abaelard, Scotus or Ockham, or to one or more of the topics which were of interest to medieval philosophers. The course aims to show how understanding medieval philosophy is essential for the history of Christian thought and philosophy up to modern times.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy
1973

PHIL 302

: Medieval Philosophy
2021 Semester One (1213)
A detailed introduction to either the work of a leading medieval philosopher, for example Augustine, Abaelard, Scotus or Ockham, or to one or more of the topics which were of interest to medieval philosophers. The course aims to show how understanding medieval philosophy is essential for the history of Christian thought and philosophy up to modern times.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy
1974

PHIL 302

: Medieval Philosophy
2020 Semester Two (1205)
A detailed introduction to either the work of a leading medieval philosopher, for example Augustine, Abaelard, Scotus or Ockham, or to one or more of the topics which were of interest to medieval philosophers. The course aims to show how understanding medieval philosophy is essential for the history of Christian thought and philosophy up to modern times.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy, or EUROPEAN 100 and 15 points at Stage II in Philosophy
1975

PHIL 306

: Language, Truth and Meaning
2024 Semester One (1243)
Explores how language is used to communicate ideas. Topics may include: the nature of meaning, how words can convey meaning, how word meaning combines to create sentential meaning, how we communicate better by not saying what we mean, how we repair and reconstrue utterances to extract meaning, how truth is related to meaning, how slurs work.
Subject: Philosophy
Prerequisite: 30 points at Stage II in Philosophy